If you really want to hear about it...
deceptive-decadence:

I love you baby

deceptive-decadence:

I love you baby

perfectmadness:

4/365 (by Burning-Heart)

"The blonde was some dancer. She was one of the best dancers I ever danced with…She knocked me out. I mean it. I was half in love with her by the time we sat down" (70, 73).

"The one ugly one, Laverne, wasn’t too bad a dancer but the other one, old Marty, was murder. Old Marty was like dragging the Statue of Liberty around the floor" (74).

"…she can dance…You can cross over, or do some corny dips, or even jitterbug a little, and she stays right with you. You can even tango, for God’s sake” (175).

Dancing is something that Holden truly enjoys, especially when he has an impressive partner, and he seems to base some judgement of a person’s character on their dancing.

"She started jitterbugging with me-but just very nice and easy, not corny" (73).

The jitterbug became popular in the 1940s and involves a lot of twists, kicks, and fast feet movement. It is a very strenuous dance that requires skill and physical vigor. Holden probably isn’t fit enough to do this dance because he has “no wind, if you want to know the truth” and runs out of breath easily (5). However, he never tries to do the harder moves of jitterbugging because ”hate[s] a guy that does a lot of show-off tricky stuff on the dance floor,” so it can’t be determined whether he can actually do it or not.

Holden helps a little girl tie her skates at the park. This can be connected to Holden’s dream of becoming the catcher in the rye, because he’s securing the little girl’s childhood in the form of the skates.
Holden’s mother buys Holden the wrong skates which suggests that Holden may not have had the most fulfilling childhood.  

Holden helps a little girl tie her skates at the park. This can be connected to Holden’s dream of becoming the catcher in the rye, because he’s securing the little girl’s childhood in the form of the skates.

Holden’s mother buys Holden the wrong skates which suggests that Holden may not have had the most fulfilling childhood.  

"The week before that, somebody’d stolen my camel’s-hair coat right out of my room, with the fur lined gloves right in the pocket," (4). 

Holdenoften times fantasizes about what he would do to the boy that stole his gloves. It’s not a matter of the gloves themselves because Holden is more than capable of buying another pair. Holden merely wants to step up to the plate and confront the situation ‘like a man’ but he cannot follow through with it in reality. 

It was just one of those things,
Just one of those crazy flings,
One of those bells that now and then rings,
Just one of those things.
It was just one of those nights,
Just one of those fabulous flights,
A trip to the moon on gossamer wings,
Just one of those things.

"Buddy Singer and his stinking band was playing "Just One of Those Things" and even they couldn’t ruin it entirely. It’s a swell song" (71).

The lyrics can allude to the way Holden explains all the ‘madman stuff’ that he does in the novel. He plays down a lot of serious aspects, like running away from school and staying in the city by himself. Or even when he tells Sally he loves her though he can barely stand her, he writes it off as him being ‘crazy’.

textbook:

Holden Caulfield
Good Monday morning to you all. Holden Caulfield was the very first post I ever did on Textbook. Somewhere down the line it got added into my tag line and now it’s kind of a thing. I haven’t styled him since the original post on 9/1/09 so here we go again. For those of you who don’t have a…

Gladstones:
In Elkton Hills Holden roomed with a boy named Dick Slagle. Holden noticed that Slagle was hiding his suitcases so that no one could see them compared to Holden’s expensive suitcases. When Holden began to hide his own suitcases, Slagle admitted that he was telling other people that Holden’s suitcases were his own. Slagle is so concerned and desperate to make an impression on the people around him that he’s willing to lie to look good. 

Gladstones:


In Elkton Hills Holden roomed with a boy named Dick Slagle. Holden noticed that Slagle was hiding his suitcases so that no one could see them compared to Holden’s expensive suitcases. When Holden began to hide his own suitcases, Slagle admitted that he was telling other people that Holden’s suitcases were his own. Slagle is so concerned and desperate to make an impression on the people around him that he’s willing to lie to look good.